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Quit (as part of the Responsibility Process)

One option for a consequence for taking responsibility might be quitting. And quitting is not just quitting your job, it could be any way of you leaving this topic: “Just do it without me.” “Don’t bother me with this topic.” “I am out.” But is it really a responsible decision to leave others handle the…

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Shame (as part of the Responsibility Process)

… and it’s always me… I just can’t do it… never could… never will… After we stop lashing out on others for the responsibility, we project the failure and mistake on ourselves – and make ourselves again the victim of unchangeable conditions of the outside world.  Opposite to the steps before (denial, lay blame and…

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Justify (as part of the Responsibility Process)

Justify – there is always a Good Reason! That’s how we grew up – explaining what happened. Making sure that it is not our fault and also not telling on the neighbors kid. So… blame it to some unspecified external root cause, justify your specific follow-up behavior and – in one swoop – you are…

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Lay Blame (as part of the Responsibility Process)

In the moment of taking responsibility (or not) finding someone else to lay the blame on is easy and we do it all the time… at least in my experience and I guess I am not the only one. “I achieve my part of the Sprint Goal, but Paul did not.” “We couldn’t deliver because the other…

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Denial (as part of the Responsibility Process)

Beginner’s Thoughts about the Responsibility Process: Denial I just started the Responsibility Process Immersion program. Well, I didn’t totally start with the Responsibility Process, as I got introduced to it at the Scrum Gathering in 2016 when attending Christopher Avery’s talk and -in the aftermath- reading the corresponding book. This summer I decided to go…

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Agile Developer & Technical Excellence

From the Agile Manifesto:
Principle #9 – Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
Principle #11 – The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.

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7+1 Decision Strategies in Teams

A big loss factor in many organizations is unclear decisions and thus often a failure to achieve the goal of various meetings: are all the necessary people present? Are more than the necessary people present? What is needed to make the decision? Is this group actually allowed to make this decision and what does that mean then? So specifically, is this a valid decision or will it be brought back to the table, challenged, questioned, ignored, discussed again, ultimately resolved in the next meeting, perhaps in a different set of participants, thus nullifying both meetings?

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7+1 Entscheidungsstrategien in Teams [German]

Ein großer Verlust-Faktor in vielen Organisationen sind unklare Entscheidungen und damit auch häufig eine Verfehlung des Ziels von diversen Meetings: sind alle notwendigen Personen anwesend? Sind mehr als die notwendigen Personen anwesend? Was wird benötigt um die Entscheidung zu fällen? Darf diese Gruppe diese Entscheidung eigentlich fällen und was bedeutet das dann? Also konkret: ist das eine gültige Entscheidung oder wird sie im nächsten Meeting, in der nächsten Gesprächsrunde, vielleicht in einem anderen Teilnehmerkreis, wieder auf den Tisch gebracht, angezweifelt, in Frage gestellt, ignoriert, erneut diskutiert, letztendlich aufgelöst und damit beide Meetings zunichte gemacht?

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X-Wing-model

The Agile Coaching Competency Framework is nowadays the standard definition for competencies Agile Coaches need in their role. Due to its shape, it’s also referred to as the X-wing model.

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